Monday, December 8, 2014

Tip of the Week: Educanon - Insert Questions into Movies!: December 8, 2014

Educanon is an amazing and super simple online tool that lets you insert questions (even record your voice), anywhere you want, into a movie! Think about the possibilities! Use this technique as a formal assessment and gather the data from each student! Use it as a station in your classroom by inserting prompts for kids to ponder.. Insert questions as a way to dipstick understanding.. There are so many ways this process can help you and your students deepen understanding on any topic.  The free version allows you to create the following types of questions: 
You can even embed questions that you would normally ask the entire class while playing a movie.  It's an easy way to pause and reflect without you having to remember when/where to press the PAUSE button.

Here is an example of a lesson created by Megan Bowhers for a kindergarten lesson on rhyming words:

https://www.educanon.com/public/52413/139857

The videos must reside on the internet before you can bring them into educanon.  Did you know that every teacher in Sudbury is connected to their very own YouTube channel?  Did you also know that you can upload videos to this channel and share them as publicly or as privately as needed?  While logged in to your Google email, simply go to the grid on the right and locate YouTube!  (you may have to click "More")

This will come in very handy in the future as many online applications now make it easy to embed or link to videos directly from YouTube.. 

Check out some other educanon videos here:




Monday, December 1, 2014

Tip of the Week: The Four S's of Notetaking: Part 4: December 1, 2014

.. the 4th and final..

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"When choosing a note-taking strategy and platform, a key component should be whether or not a student's notes can be shared among peers as well as with teachers, tutors, or parents. Beyond simply emailing a document or copying a piece of paper, digital notes can become a collaborative experience.
Mark Engstrom, an eighth grade Geography teacher in São Paulo, Brazil, experimented with a different style of note taking to build content knowledge in his class. Rather than ask each student to document his or her own learning during a lecture, he created a scenario where they curated their collective knowledge. Students assumed different responsibilities and employed strategies with an eye toward contributing to the class experience.

The Pen Is Mightier Than the ????

While Mueller and Oppenheimer certainly raise critical points about the dangers of using technology to transcribe notes, that is not to say that we should punish the tool. As Matt Scully wrote to parents at his school:
Their results are not saying students should avoid technology. They seem to be clearly stating that note taking is an activity where the note taker needs to process information and reframe, reorganize, and work with the data to make note taking useful.
Today's students exist in a new (and abundant) economy of information where they require strategies that support their own acquisition of knowledge, allow them to save their notes across devices, permit them search to through the vast quantities of information, and share their learning with the rest of their community. By teaching these 4Ss, we are providing them with the skills that they will need to succeed in a world that requires constant access to information that can be applied to new problems and settings."
Here's a great video of a teacher working with his students, explaining how digital notetaking has changed the way he teaches and the way students take more ownership of their learning..


(http://www.edutopia.org/blog/the-4ss-of-note-taking-beth-holland)